Saying Yes to Fashion During a Global Pandemic

In a year that knee-capped apparel and designer retail, launching a fashion shopping app might seem like madness. But for The Yes cofounders Julie Bornstein and Amit Aggarwal, the risks were worth it — and not just for them, but for the fashion world at large.

The way Bornstein explained it, when The Yes debuted in May, it was on something of a retail rescue mission.

“Our heads were all spinning from what this coronavirus thing was in late March, which is when our original launch date was going to be,” she told WWD. “But by the time May came around, we were like, ‘Listen, we want to do everything we can to help drive volume for these brands.’

“Because a lot of their traditional channels were not open: their stores weren’t open, their orders were being canceled,” she continued. “We see ourselves as a partner in all senses of

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Christian Siriano On Secondhand Stigma, Fashion in Politics, and Cori Bush

As pop culture puts it, shopping in thrift stores can trigger painful memories (see: Marge Simpson reworking a Chanel-esque suit, Pen15‘s tween leads pawing over a secondhand Tommy Hilfiger shirt, or Jenny Humphrey’s entire character arc). But thanks to a growing resale market—with an expected value of $64 billion in the next five years—the firsthand shame of secondhand shopping is finally starting to fade.

In order to normalize the practice of buying used, thredUP, one of the top destinations for online consignment shopping, tapped Christian Siriano to create the first universal logo to represent gently worn clothes. Much like the symbol for recycling, thredUP’s hanger-shaped logo is intended to be worn as a badge of honor for your thrifted find.

thredup

Courtesy of thredUP

“I think it’s a very important thing happening in fashion, and I think this whole idea of sustainable fashion is something every brand

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Sinead Burke, Maura Horton launch JUNIPERunltd, a new shopping hub for people with disabilities

We are all works in progress; even the successful women you look up to faced stumbling blocks along the way and continue to work hard to stay at the top of their game. In this series, we’re sitting down with the people that inspire us to find out: How’d they do it? And what is success really like? This is “Getting There.”

Maura Horton and Sinéad Burke have never actually met in person, but they’re working closely together to make the fashion industry more inclusive for people with disabilities. Horton, 51, is the inventor of MagnaReady, an adaptive clothing line that replaces zippers and buttons with magnetic closures, and Burke, 30, is an activist and the first little person to be featured on the cover of Vogue U.K.

Both women are passionate about adaptive fashion and inclusivity and have teamed up to launch JUNIPERunltd, an e-commerce platform and

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How Harry Styles, Marine Serre and Emily in Paris influenced wardrobes this year



Lily Collins standing next to a body of water


© Provided by PrestigeOnline


While the Covid-19 pandemic has played havoc with the way we dress in 2020, it’s far from being the only influence on wardrobes this year. British singer Harry Styles, French fashion designer Marine Serre and the Netflix show Emily in Paris also inspired people’s shopping habits, according to the Year in Fashion 2020 report from the global fashion search platform, Lyst.

So 2020 is and always will be a peculiar kind of year, marked by the Covid-19 pandemic, mass lockdowns around the world, and profound changes in the way we do things like shop and work.

It’s also been a year of activism, with movements like Black Lives Matter that have influenced various domains such as culture and fashion.

As the end of the year approaches, it’s time to take stock, and it’s no surprise to see that our wardrobes have been inspired by the

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